Marines

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Gen. Robert B. Neller, Commandant of the Marine Corps, awards Staff Sgt. Christin J. McAdams with 6th Communications Battalion, Force Headquarters Group, with the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for her outstanding efforts as an active reserve career planner during the annual Commandant of the Marine Corps’ 2016 Combined Awards Ceremony, Feb. 8, 2017, in Quantico, Va. Reserve career planners work hard to retain, train and prepare both active duty and reserve Marines for what is next in their future or career that best fits their unique individual needs.

Photo by Cpl. Gabrielle Quire

CMC awards Reserve Career Planner of the Year

10 Feb 2017 | Cpl. Gabrielle Quire Marine Corps Forces Reserves

    A career planner with 6th Communications Battalion, Force Headquarters Group, was recognized as the Active Reserve Career Planner of the Year, during the annual Commandant of the Marine Corps’ 2016 Combined Awards Ceremony, Feb. 8, 2017, in Quantico, Virginia.

    The awardee, Staff Sgt. Christin J. McAdams, was also presented with the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for her hard work and dedication.

    “The Marine Corps doesn’t recognize excellence to the degree that we should, but today you have been selected amongst your peers so the United States Marine Corps can recognize your excellence,” said Gen. Robert B. Neller, commandant of the Marine Corps to the awardees. “Tomorrow is a new day that you will have to get up and climb that mountain again, but know that we appreciate all that you do.”

    While career planners work hard year round to assist other Marines, once a year they have a chance to be recognized by the CMC at the Combined Awards Ceremony.

    The Combined Awards Program was initiated in 1995 when Gen. Charles C. Krulak, 31st Commandant of the Marine Corps, sanctioned the first Recruiter of the Year award. Since then, the program has expanded to include prior service recruiters, drill instructors, Marine security guards, Marine combat instructors, career planners and athletes. The program’s mission is to recognize exemplary Marines within those billets and honor them for the outstanding example they display and their dedication to setting the bar to the highest standards of the Marine Corps.

    Reserve career planners work hard to retain, train and prepare both active duty and Reserve Marines for what is next in their future or career that best fits their unique individual needs.

    “The difference between Reserve and active duty is that active Marines come into work every day, it’s how they make their living,” McAdams said.  “Reserve Marines on the other hand have civilian lives. They come into work one weekend a month and two weeks out of the year, so the amount of time we have to train and guide them is incredibly short.”

    The guidance Marines receive from their career planners is an invaluable resource that could greatly impact their future. Career planners offer career counseling and ensure Marines clearly understand the opportunities available to them. They also work hard to put Marines in a job that fits best or help transition them from active to reserve or civilian life. Career planners help ensure the Corps stays at its peak readiness by making sure each Marine is exactly where they want and need to be in their profession.

    McAdams stated the next step in her Marine Corps career is to commission as an officer, but one thing will never change, her drive to help Marines better themselves and prepare them for the future.

    “Advice I would give to other career planners is to know your job, and while you may not have Marines directly under your supervision, your job is to solely help every Marine that walks into your office,” McAdams said.


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