Marines

Photo Information

Maj. Lisbeth M. Andriessen, the Innovative Readiness Training program manager for Marine Forces Reserve, embraces the elements 26 miles above the Arcitc Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska, where she is overseeing the execution of IRT Arctic Care 2018 in the Northwest Arctic Borough, April 13-27, 2018. IRT Arctic Care 2018 is a joint and multi-national force providing medical, dental, optometry and veterinary care for underserved villages in the Maniillaq Service Area April 16-24. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Melissa Martens)

Photo by Sgt. Melissa Martens

Hometown Heroes of IRT Arctic Care 2018

16 Apr 2018 | Sgt. Melissa Martens Marine Corps Forces Reserves

Reserve Marines typically spend two weeks each year building their capabilities at an Annual Training exercise and one weekend each month supporting their active duty counterparts. Maj. Lisbeth M. Andriessen is a Portland, Indiana, native and Reserve Marine who knew she wanted to serve more.

Andriessen is the Innovative Readiness Training program manager for Marine Forces Reserve and is currently 26 miles above the Arctic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska, where she is overseeing the execution of IRT Arctic Care 2018 in the Northwest Arctic Borough, April 13-27, 2018.

Innovative Readiness Training is a Department of Defense sponsored program that aims to produce mission-ready forces through military training opportunities that provide key services for underserved communities throughout the United States.

As the program manager for IRT, Andriessen is on Active Duty Operational Support (ADOS) orders, which means she serves full time as a Marine throughout the duration of her orders. In this position, she wears many hats and is responsible for ensuring each training evolution is successfully completed.

“For IRT Arctic Care, my main role is to supervise and make sure the training runs smoothly,” Andriessen said. “I’m kind of behind the scenes and if a problem comes up that the training unit needs assistance with, I am here to jump in if need be so the training can continue and the communities are served.”

Andriessen joined the Marine Corps in 2005 and served four years on active duty as a supply officer. After her first enlistment, she decided to switch over to the Marine Corps Reserve and see what opportunities were out there.

“I joined the Reserve force after completing my first contract,” Andriessen said. “After six months I decided to take a break and pursue my civilian career. Years later, I was thinking about going back to the Reserves and out of the blue, a recruiter called me and asked me to fill a job at Marine Forces Reserve. I couldn’t pass it up.”

Now residing in Covington, Louisiana, with her family, Andriessen takes time to reflect on her career and is thankful for this opportunity in the Marine Corps Reserve.

“This is the most unique position I have ever been put in to with the Marine Corps,” Andriessen said. “I have seen so many remote communities of the United States and I have had the opportunity to assist in planning some wonderful projects. It is one of the most difficult and challenging positions I have had to fill, but with the support of my husband and family, I’ve been able to take this opportunity and run with it.”